Seborrhoeic Keratoses

Removal of seborrhoeic keratoses (which used to be called ‘senile warts’)

Seborrhoeic keratoses are benign spots on the skin that usually appear from the age of 40. They can cause itching. Seborrhoeic keratoses may be removed by freezing (cryotherapy) or scraping/curettage (excochleation).

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a treatment in which the seborrhoeic keratoses are frozen. By freezing, the abnormal skin dies off and will subsequently be replaced by healthy skin. After treatment, there will be a scab on the skin that needs to heal. This takes about 1 to 2 weeks. The underlying skin has often a light or pink colour. This is new, healthy skin that will slowly obtain a normal skin tone. This ‘new’ skin must be protected from the sun for four weeks.

Excochleation

Excochleation is a treatment in which the seborrhoeic keratosis scraped off using a sharp knife or spoon-like instrument. As this is superficial treatment, the risk of scars is low.

Prices

Removal of seborrhoeic keratoses €90.00

Reimbursements

This treatment is not covered by health insurers.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
5

Days

Gynaecology
1 4

Days

Proctology
1 4

Days

Phlebology
2 8

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
5

Days

Gynaecology
1 4

Days

Proctology
1 4

Days

Phlebology
2 8

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.