Moles

Moles are light- to dark-brown spots on the skin. They can be flat or raised. Moles are caused by pigment cells (melanocytes) clustering together on locations on the skin. They can occur on any area of the body and differ in shape, size and colour.
If they are suspected of being malign, moles may have to be removed. This is involves a medical intervention. In most cases moles are benign and do not need to be removed for medical reasons. Removal of benign moles involves a cosmetic intervention. At Wetering Medical Centre, moles are always removed by a dermatologist.

Click here to read more about moles.

How is a mole removed?

Moles can be removed using the following methods:

  • Shaving/coagulation
  • Excision

 

The dermatologist determines which method is most suitable in each case.

Shaving/coagulation

Shaving is used for raised moles and is done under local anaesthesia. During the treatment the top layer of the skin is shaved off using a very sharp knife. After this, the wound is closed with the aid of heat (coagulation). A scab will form over the damaged tissue once the skin begins to heal, and more healthy cells are produced to restore the damaged tissue. When the skin underneath the scab has healed, the scab falls off.

Exision

Excision is used for flat moles and is also done under local anaesthesia. The entire mole and part of the surrounding skin are removed, after which the wound is sutured. The wound will heal within a few weeks. Depending on the location of the mole on the body, the dermatologist will either opt for subcutaneous (soluble) sutures or for sutures which must be removed after about a week

Risks and complications

Prior to treatment your dermatologist will discuss the risks with you. The risks include:

  • Discoloration of the skin: the skin may become slightly lighter or darker, you will therefore be advised to avoid exposure to the sun for at least 6 weeks
  • Development of scar tissue
  • Scar inflammation
  • Bruising

Moreover, when the shaving / coagulation method is use, there is a risk that the mole will grow back.

Shaving (raised moles) €195.00 (minimum price)
Excision (flat moles) €295.00 (minimum price)

Any questions?

If you have any questions, please contact us during consultation hours at 020 8203465.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
2 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 8

Days

Proctology
4 5

Days

Phlebology
1 6

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
2 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 8

Days

Proctology
4 5

Days

Phlebology
1 6

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.