Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy is a procedure in which a thin tube-like telescope (hysteroscope) is used to inspect the womb (uterus) via the vagina. To visualize the inside of the uterus, the gynaecologist channels sterile water into the uterus during the hysteroscopy and connects the hysteroscope to a camera.

The image is then displayed on a television screen. You can also watch this image. Depending on the reason for the examination, this procedure is carried out either with or without local anaesthesia (ambulatory hysteroscopy).

There are several reasons to perform a hysteroscopy. For example, abnormal bleeding during or between periods, severe menstrual cramps or bleeding more than a year after the last menstrual period (post-menopausal bleeding). This examination is also performed when there is no menstruation after curettage, and when there is a suspicion of adhesions in the uterine cavity preventing menstruation.

Furthermore, a diagnostic hysteroscopy is sometimes performed in the case of reduced fertility, and when there are repeated miscarriages or premature births. Abnormal findings on ultrasound or other examination of the uterine cavity may also be a reason to employ this method.

Hysteroscopic treatments:

• Polyps and fibroids
With an outpatient hysteroscopy we can remove small polyps and fibroids without the need for anesthesia. You can go home immediately after the examination, after a cup of coffee or tea.

• Removal of an IUD
When the wires of the spiral are no longer visible, we can search for the coil in the uterine cavity through the hysteroscope and usually remove it easily. If the coil is very stuck in the wall of the womb, the procedure is more difficult.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
3 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 7

Days

Proctology
8 0

Days

Phlebology
2 1

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
3 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 7

Days

Proctology
8 0

Days

Phlebology
2 1

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.