Eczema

Eczema

Eczema is skin disorder causing an itchy rash that appears red, rough and scaly. It may also appear as fluid-filled vesicules. There are various forms of eczema. The most common forms are:

  • Atopic eczema
  • Allergic contact eczema
  • Seborrhoeic eczema

 

Atopic eczema is a form of eczema that occurs mainly in childhood. People with atopic eczema often develop allergies as well. Eczema usually develops in the first six months of life but can occur at any age. The duration may vary widely and, in some cases, eczema may be chronic.
The cause of atopic eczema is not fully known. There are probably several factors involved, including genetic predisposition and environmental factors.

Allergic contact eczema may develop in the course of a person’s life as a result of an allergy to substances the skin comes into contact with. Known forms of contact eczema are nickel allergy and perfume allergy. There are, however, many more forms of contact eczema. The dermatologists at Wetering Medical Centre can test you for contact allergies.

Seborrhoeic eczema is a form of eczema that is related to, and often occurs in association with, dandruff. It is a scaly rash that affects the scalp, eyebrows or side of the nose. Seborrhoeic eczema often gets worse in the winter, and if a person’s resistance to infection is low.

There are many treatments for eczema. The cause can sometimes be removed but not always. If the cause cannot be removed, treatment mainly consist of fighting the symptoms using ointments and creams. Medication or light therapy (UVB) may also help. Our dermatologist can properly inform you about the safe use of these treatments. There are various treatments for the different types of eczema.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
2 8

Days

Gynaecology
2 8

Days

Proctology
4 0

Days

Phlebology
0 7

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
2 8

Days

Gynaecology
2 8

Days

Proctology
4 0

Days

Phlebology
0 7

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.