Pigment spots and seboorhoeic keratoses

Skin therapist

Skin therapists have been trained to provide skin treatments. One example is acne therapy, including deep cleansing, glycolic acid peeling and microdermabrasion. In serious cases of acne, this therapy is provided in addition to the treatment provided by the dermatologist.

Less serious cases of acne may be treated by the skin therapist alone. Other examples are the removal of warts and oedema massage. The title of skin therapist is a protected title as laid down in the Individual Healthcare Professions Act. The skin therapist at the Wetering Dermatological Centre provides various treatments:

 

  • Removal of seborrhoeic seborrhoeic-keratoses
  • Removal of pigment spots
  • Deep cleansing/microdermabrasion

Removal of seborrhoeic keratoses (which used to be called ‘senile warts’)

Seborrhoeic keratoses are benign spots on the skin that usually appear from the age of 40. They can cause itching. Seborrhoeic keratoses may be removed by freezing (cryotherapy) or scraping/curettage (excochleation).

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a treatment in which the seborrhoeic keratoses are frozen. By freezing, the abnormal skin dies off and will subsequently be replaced by healthy skin. After treatment, there will be a scab on the skin that needs to heal. This takes about 1 to 2 weeks. The underlying skin has often a light or pink colour. This is new, healthy skin that will slowly obtain a normal skin tone. This ‘new’ skin must be protected from the sun for four weeks.

Excochleation

Excochleation is a treatment in which the seborrhoeic keratosis scraped off using a sharp knife or spoon-like instrument. As this is superficial treatment, the risk of scars is low.

Removal of pigment spots by means of cryotherapy

Pigment spots are dark-brown spots on the skin caused by excessive accumulation of pigment in certain places in the body.
Cryotherapy is a treatment in which the pigment spots are frozen. By freezing, the abnormal skin dies off and will subsequently be replaced by healthy skin. After treatment, there will be a scab on the skin that needs to heal. This takes about 1 to 2 weeks. The underlying skin has often a light or pink colour. This is new, healthy skin that will slowly obtain a normal skin tone. This ‘new’ skin must be protected from the sun for four weeks.
One of the complications in cryotherapy may be that the treated skin becomes permanently lighter than the surrounding skin. In consultation with the dermatologist, the skin therapist will determine whether your pigment spots are suitable to be treated with cryotherapy

Deep cleansing/microdermabrasion

Microdermabrasion is a mechanical form of exfoliation that can be used to treat fine lines, wrinkles, acne and pigment discolorations. Dermabrasion removes dead skin cells layer by layer, revealing a new, soft, smooth and glowing skin. . This treatment also stimulates the growth of new cells as well as collagen, and has a lifting effect. The skin may be slightly red and sensitive after treatment. You are advised not to expose your skin to the sun during the first two weeks after treatment.

Removal of seborrhoeic keratoses

Per 45 min. €90.00

Removal of pigment spots in the face

1-3 pigment spots €100.00
3-6 pigment spots €150.00

Any questions?

If you have any questions, please contact us during consultation hours at 020 8203465.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
3 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 7

Days

Proctology
8 0

Days

Phlebology
2 1

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.

Waiting time indication

Dermatology
3 8

Days

Gynaecology
1 7

Days

Proctology
8 0

Days

Phlebology
2 1

Days

If you find the waiting time too long, you can always contact us or ask your health care provider for waiting list mediation. Your health care provider can support you in this, so that you may be able to receive assistance more quickly. The maximum acceptable waiting time that healthcare providers and health insurers have jointly agreed upon (the Treek norm) for access to the outpatient clinic and diagnostics is 4 weeks. The maximum acceptable waiting time for treatment is 7 weeks.